Where the world goes to when it wants to get out of the world!


1-IMG_3484Since time immemorial climbing a mountain top has been associated with spiritual quest and enlightenment. A solitary search for purpose and some undefinable yet experienced meaning of life. There is a bit of magic in the mountains. A bit of mystery. Wonderment and awe. They stand like the midway points between heaven and earth. Calling the seer, the saint, and the seeker alike to some secret adventure. And as adventurers – trekking-enthusiasts, wild-life photographers, bird-watchers, artists, thinkers, writers, geologists, anthropologists, archaeologists –  the soul of the seekers have coveted the Coorg mountain tops and valleys with equal faith and fervour. Cause in here lies a history that pre-dates Alexander the Great, a world filled with stories yet untold, and the mystical murmurs of trees that are hundreds of years old. For the explorer Honey Valley Estate is a transit point on the way to little and large secrets of the mountain tops, the rainforest, waterfalls, and meandering streams that sustain the magnificent jungle life. Its perched 4,250 ft above Shopping Malls, City Streets, Neon Signs, Discotheques, Beauty Parlours, Bill Boards, Cable TV, Fast Food, 9-5, the Rat Race, Rush Hour, Deadlines, Traffic Jams, the Daily Grind, and the Keeping Up With. A secluded sojourn it is, for the beginning of your journey into the depths of your own soul.

Welcome to Honey Valley. The mountains are calling.

Bonfires for Bonding


Under the dark sky, watched over by thousands of star, basking in their light, light a bonfire and gather around for a magical time that is at once contemporary and historical.

Under the dark sky, basking in the light of a thousands stars, light a bonfire and gather around it for a magical time that is at once as contemporary as today and as historical as the discovery of fire.

Stargazing


Situated deep within the rain forests of Coorg, Honey Valley offers the perfect setting with its unpolluted, crystal-clear skies for both amateur and professional astronomers, and casual observers. As entertainment and education Stargazing is gaining popularity among our guests.

Situated deep within the rain forests of Coorg, Honey Valley offers the perfect setting with its unpolluted, crystal-clear skies for both amateur and professional astronomers, and casual observers. As entertainment and education Stargazing is gaining popularity among our guests.

Did you know you can see a galaxy 2½ million light-years away with your unaided eyes? Craters on the Moon with binoculars? Countless wonders await you on any clear night. The first step is simply to look up and ask, “What’s that?” When you do, you’re taking the first step toward a lifetime of cosmic exploration and enjoyment.

But what, exactly, comes next? Too many newcomers to astronomy get lost in dead ends and quit in frustration. It shouldn’t be that way.

What advice would help beginners the most? A while ago, the Sky & Telescope editors got together to brainstorm this question. Pooling thoughts from more than 100 years of collective experience answering the phones and mail, we came up with the following pointers to help newcomers past the most common pitfalls and onto the likeliest route to success.

1. Learn the sky with the unaided eye.
Astronomy is an outdoor nature hobby. Go out into the night and learn the starry names and patterns overhead. Use the monthly naked-eye star charts in Sky & Telescope, the hobby’s essential monthly magazine. Or download the free Getting Started in Astronomy flyer (which only has bimonthly maps). Even if you live in a densely populated, light-polluted area, there’s more to see up there than you might imagine.

Even if you go no further, the ability to look up and say, “There’s Polaris” or “That’s Saturn” will provide pleasure, and perhaps a sense of place in the cosmos, for the rest of your life.

2. Ransack your public library.

Astronomy is a learning hobby. Its joys come from intellectual discovery and knowledge of the cryptic night sky. But you have to make these discoveries, and gain this knowledge, by yourself. In other words, you need to become self-taught.

The public library is the beginner’s most important astronomical tool. Comb the astronomy shelf for books about the basic knowledge you need to know, and for guidebooks to what you can see out there in the wide universe. Read about those stars and constellations you’re finding with the naked eye, and about how the stars change through the night and the seasons. If your library doesn’t have enough, cruise your local bookstores (not to mention the skyandtelescope own online store). And check the magazine racks for Sky & Telescope. It offers a big, user-friendly sky map each month, observing tips and projects for all skill levels, and reports on frontline astronomical research.

Of course the Web is a tremendous resource. But the Web is a hodgepodge. There are excellent beginner’s sites (like skyandtelescope), but what you really need right now is a coherent, well-organized framework into which to put the knowledge that you will pick up as you go along. In other words, you need books. Go to the library.

3. Thinking telescope? Start with binoculars.

Binoculars make an ideal “first telescope” — for several reasons. They show you a wide field of view, making it easy to find your way around — whereas a higher-power telescope magnifies only a tiny, hard-to-locate bit of sky. Binoculars show a view that’s right-side up and straight in front of you, making it easy to see where you’re pointing. (An astronomical telescope‘s view, by contrast, is often upside down, is sometimes mirror-imaged as well, and is usually presented at right angles to the direction you’re aiming.) Binoculars are also relatively cheap, widely available, and a breeze to carry and store.

And their performance is surprisingly respectable. Ordinary 7- to 10-power binoculars improve on the naked-eye view about as much as a good amateur telescope improves on the binoculars — for much less than half the price.

For astronomy, the larger the front lenses the better. High optical quality is also important, more so than for binoculars that are used on daytime scenes. Modern image-stabilized binoculars are a tremendous boon for astronomy (though expensive). But any binoculars that are already knocking around the back of your closet are enough to launch an amateur-astronomy career.

4. Dive into maps and guidebooks.

Once you have the binoculars, what do you do with them? You can have fun looking at the Moon and sweeping the star fields of the Milky Way, but that will wear thin pretty fast. However, if you’ve learned the constellations and obtained detailed sky maps, binoculars can keep you happily busy for years.

They’ll reveal dozens of star clusters, galaxies, and nebulae. They’ll show the ever-changing positions of Jupiter’s moons and the crescent phases of Venus. You can identify dozens of craters, plains, and mountains on the Moon. You can split scores of interesting double stars and follow the fadings and brightenings of numerous variable stars. If you know what to look for.

A sailor of the seas needs top-notch charts, and so does a sailor of the skies. Fine maps bring the fascination of hunting out faint secrets in hidden sky realms. Many guidebooks describe what’s to be hunted and the nature of the objects you find. Moreover, the skills you’ll develop using binoculars to locate these things are exactly the skills you’ll need to put a telescope to good use.

Plan indoors what you’ll do outdoors. Spread out your charts and guides on a big table, find things that ought to be in range of your equipment, and figure out how you’ll get there. Plan your expeditions before heading out into the nightly wilderness.

5. Keep an astronomy diary.

This one is optional. But we notice that the people who get the most out of the hobby are often those who keep an observing logbook of what they do and see. Keeping a record concentrates the mind — even if it’s just a jotting like “November 7th — out with the 10×50 binocs — clear windy night — NGC 457 in Cassiopeia a faint glow next to two brighter stars.” Get a spiral-bound notebook and keep it with the rest of your observing gear. Being able to look back on your early experiences and sightings in years to come gives deeper meaning to your activities now.

For some people, anyway. If this isn’t your thing or becomes too much of a chore, never mind.

6. Seek out other amateurs.

Self-education is fine as far as it goes, but there’s nothing like sharing an interest with others. Hundreds of astronomy clubs exist worldwide; see our directory. Call or e-mail a club near you, or check out its web site, and see when it holds meetings or night time observing sessions — “star parties.” These events, some of which draw hundreds of amateurs, can offer a fine opportunity to try different telescopes, learn what they will and will not do, pick up advice and new skills, and make friends.

Astronomy clubs range from tiny to huge, from moribund to vital, from ingrown to extremely welcoming of newcomers. You’ll have to check them out yourself. But none would be publicizing themselves in our directory if they weren’t hoping that you would call.

Big ones, little ones, fat ones, skinny ones — whatever kind of telescope you choose, don’t skimp on quality. A good one will serve you for a lifetime.

7. When it’s time for a telescope, plunge in deep.

Eventually you’ll know you’re ready. You’ll have spent hours poring over the ads and reviews. You’ll know the different kinds of telescopes, what you can expect of them, and what you’ll do with the one you pick.

This is no time to skimp on quality; shun the flimsy, semi-toy “department store” scopes that may have caught your eye. The telescope you want has two essentials. The first is a solid, steady, smoothly working mount. The second is high-quality, “diffraction-limited” optics.

Naturally you’ll also want large aperture (size), but don’t lose sight of portability and convenience. Remember, the best telescope for you is the one you’ll use most. Sometimes gung-ho novices forget this and purchase a huge “white elephant” that is difficult to carry, set up, and take down, so it rarely gets used. How good an astronomer you become depends not on what your instrument is, but on how much you use it. (For more specific tips on buying, see “A Guide to Choosing a Telescope“).

Many new telescopes have built-in computers and motors that can, in theory, point the scope to any celestial object at the push of a few buttons (after you do some initial setup and alignment). These “Go To” scopes are fun to use and can certainly help you locate sights you might otherwise overlook. But opinions in the amateur-astronomy world are divided about whether “flying on automatic pilot,” at least for beginners, keeps you from learning to fly on your own. We think it’s important, at least for backup purposes, to be able to use your charts and constellation knowledge to find telescopic objects by yourself — especially if the scope’s batteries die after you’ve driven 50 miles to a dark-sky location!

And as Terence Dickinson and Alan Dyer say in their Backyard Astronomer’s Guide, “A full appreciation of the universe cannot come without developing the skills to find things in the sky and understanding how the sky works. This knowledge comes only by spending time under the stars with star maps in hand and a curious mind.” Without these, “the sky never becomes a friendly place.”

It’s true that telescopes can cost thousands of dollars, but some good ones can be had for only a few hundred. Can’t afford the scope you want? Save up until you can. More time using binoculars while building a telescope fund will be time you’ll never regret.

If you choose to start with a small but high-quality scope, it can serve as your traveling companion for a lifetime — whenever it’s impractical to bring along the big, more expensive scope that you eventually buy after your commitment to the hobby has passed the test of time.

8. Lose your ego.

Astronomy teaches patience and humility — and you had better be prepared to learn them. Not everything will work the first time. You’ll hunt for some wonder in the depths and miss it, and hunt again, and miss it again. This is normal. But eventually, with increasing knowledge, you will succeed.

There’s nothing you can do about the clouds that move in to block your view, the extreme distance and faintness of the objects of your desire, or the special event that you missed because you got all set up one minute late. The universe will not bend to your wishes; you must take it on its own terms.

Most objects that are within the reach of any telescope, no matter what its size, are barely within its reach. So most of the time you’ll be hunting for things that appear very dim or very small, or both. You need the attitude that they will not come to you; you must go to them. If flashy visuals are what you’re after, go watch TV.

9. Relax and have fun.

Part of losing your ego is not getting upset at your telescope because it’s less than perfect. Perfection doesn’t exist, no matter what you paid. If you find yourself getting wound up over Pluto’s invisibility or the aberrations of your eyepiece, take a deep breath and remember why you’re doing this. Amateur astronomy should be calming and fun.

Learn to take pleasure in whatever your instrument can indeed show you. The more you look and examine, the more you will see — and the more you’ll become at home in the night sky. Set your own pace, and delight in the beauty and mystery of our amazing universe.


Article courtesy
skyandtelescope.com

Environment Friendly Hospitality


Honey Valley is an ecosystem in itself that is home to wild boars, elephants, foxes, wild hare, monkeys, the South-Indian honey-loving martens, flying squirrels and dozens of different species of plants, insects, and birds. We are committed to protecting and maintaining the fragile balance between man and nature here in the very best way possible. All our guests are requested to cooperate with us.

Honey Valley is an ecosystem in itself that is home to wild boars, elephants, foxes, wild rabbits, monkeys, the South-Indian honey-loving martens, flying squirrels and dozens of different species of plants, insects, and birds. We are committed to protecting and maintaining the fragile balance between man and nature here in the very best way possible. All our guests are requested to cooperate with us.

As Kodavas we believe more in reverence towards nature and our ancestors then in the strict following of the Vedic principles. Hence, To live in harmony with nature is part of our culture. Everything that is Honey Valley or is related to it is born and nourished on this  fundamental belief held fast since the time immemorial.

At Honey Valley our attempt is to help you experience the magnificence of nature and its inhabitants without disturbing or destroying, in its wake, anything that belongs to her. We generate a major share of the power required to run Honey Valley in the form of hydroelectricity. Till 2011, hydro electricity was the only form of electricity used at Honey Valley. Bath water is heated using solar power. Many of the vegetable, and most of the fruits served during meals is home-grown and organically cultivated. While regular vehicles cannot climb up to Honey Valley by default due to the nature of the path, we also prohibit 4x4s from entering the property. This is solely to reduce both air and noise pollution which adversely effect the wildlife population in the estate and the surrounding rainforest. Cows are grown in-house to provide both fresh milk and manure for organic farming.

Since hydro electricity is our major source of power, it is important for our guests to remember that neither the water source nor the electricity it helps produce here is limitless. Wasting either creates an essential resource vacuüm that debilitates our ability to offer guests like you many of the amenities we do today. So be considerate. Avoid wastage of electricity and water. Switch off lights when not necessary. Don’t leave mobile phones connected to power sockets even after they are fully charged. If not necessary, try to make up with one bath a day. Every little thing you do in conserving power and water goes a long way in helping other guests enjoy the experience of Honey Valley just like you wish to. Moreover, it prevents over-taxing the natural reserves that sustain and support the natural wildlife in the region. Do coöperate with us in maintaining the delicate balance between use and abuse of nature’s reserves.

Honey Valley – A Photographer’s Delight


Right from Coorg Roses, Coorg Lilacs, to over 50 different types of birds, over a dozen varieties of butterflies, monkeys, foxes, wild boars, elephants, to picturesque valleys and towering mountains, Honey Valley is every photographer's delightful dream. Bring your camera along!

Right from flowers such as Coorg Roses, Coorg Lilacs, to over 50 different types of birds, over a dozen varieties of butterflies, monkeys, foxes, wild boars, elephants, to a sedate coffee estate, picturesque valleys and towering mountains, Honey Valley is every photographer’s delightful dream. Bring your camera along!

Sustaining the Honey Valley Ecosystem


Honey Valley is an ecosystem in itself that is home to wild boars, elephants, foxes, wild hare, monkeys, the South-Indian honey-loving martens, flying squirrels and dozens of different species of plants, insects, and birds. We are committed to protecting and maintaining the fragile balance between man and nature here in the very best way possible. All our guests are requested to cooperate with us.

Honey Valley is an ecosystem in itself that is home to wild boars, elephants, foxes, wild rabbits, monkeys, the South-Indian honey-loving martens, flying squirrels and dozens of different species of plants, insects, and birds. We are committed to protecting and maintaining the fragile balance between man and nature here in the very best way possible. All our guests are requested to coöperate with us.

Honey Valley, apart from being home to the our family, is also home to many varied and wonderful species of wild life, both big and small. Wild boars, foxes, wild hares, monkeys, ant-eaters, to varieties of snails, frogs, squirrels, butterflies and birds live here. Over Fifty different types of birds have been, as yet, spotted in and around Honey Valley. As a guest, your thoughtfulness can make sure their continued existence in the valley. Below are a few guidelines:

(A). Avoid high decibel noises such as loud music, boisterous revelry, and parties either in the day or night. While they disturb other guests greatly, they practically scare the life out of most birds and animals around forcing them to abandon their homes – the Valley. Be considerate. Do not disrupt the gentle and precarious ecosystem that is Honey Valley.

(B) When hiking, avoid leaving behind trash such as plastic bottles, biscuit wrappers, and disposable plates. Most water-bodies you see in the jungle are a source of sustenance for both Man and Animal. Over 70 families in a village downhill depend on drinking water from these streams and waterfalls. Animals are known to die due to ingestion of plastic waste, especially plastic bags, over a period of time. Respect their need for clean water. Respect their lives.

(c) Thousands of nature-loving people like you visit Honey Valley every year. This gives birth to, among other many many wonderful things, an unavoidable but ugly end result – garbage. Tonnes and tonnes of garbage a year. In a delicate ecosystem that is Honey Valley, waste management requires greater thought, care and effort. And your coöperation as our guest is essential if we are to continue keeping the Valley uncontaminated, undisturbed for not just us but also the abundant wildlife, and the rich flora and fauna.

All you have to do is avoid littering or throwing cigarette butts on the ground. Always use the garbage cans and ash trays provided in your room, and in all common areas in the property. This ensures that no trash is unaccounted for, and what needs be burned will be burned, what can go as compost will go as compost, what can be recycled will be recycled. Be kind to the Valley. Help us keep it pristine and clean. Help her stay alive.

It is the coöperation, support and affection from well-wishing guests like you that allows Honey Valley continue providing a novel holiday experience to nature lovers world over. We appreciate your goodwill, and your presence in our home. Enjoy your stay. Enjoy the food. Enjoy the Valley.