Environment Friendly Hospitality


Honey Valley is an ecosystem in itself that is home to wild boars, elephants, foxes, wild hare, monkeys, the South-Indian honey-loving martens, flying squirrels and dozens of different species of plants, insects, and birds. We are committed to protecting and maintaining the fragile balance between man and nature here in the very best way possible. All our guests are requested to cooperate with us.

Honey Valley is an ecosystem in itself that is home to wild boars, elephants, foxes, wild rabbits, monkeys, the South-Indian honey-loving martens, flying squirrels and dozens of different species of plants, insects, and birds. We are committed to protecting and maintaining the fragile balance between man and nature here in the very best way possible. All our guests are requested to cooperate with us.

As Kodavas we believe more in reverence towards nature and our ancestors then in the strict following of the Vedic principles. Hence, To live in harmony with nature is part of our culture. Everything that is Honey Valley or is related to it is born and nourished on this  fundamental belief held fast since the time immemorial.

At Honey Valley our attempt is to help you experience the magnificence of nature and its inhabitants without disturbing or destroying, in its wake, anything that belongs to her. We generate a major share of the power required to run Honey Valley in the form of hydroelectricity. Till 2011, hydro electricity was the only form of electricity used at Honey Valley. Bath water is heated using solar power. Many of the vegetable, and most of the fruits served during meals is home-grown and organically cultivated. While regular vehicles cannot climb up to Honey Valley by default due to the nature of the path, we also prohibit 4x4s from entering the property. This is solely to reduce both air and noise pollution which adversely effect the wildlife population in the estate and the surrounding rainforest. Cows are grown in-house to provide both fresh milk and manure for organic farming.

Since hydro electricity is our major source of power, it is important for our guests to remember that neither the water source nor the electricity it helps produce here is limitless. Wasting either creates an essential resource vacuüm that debilitates our ability to offer guests like you many of the amenities we do today. So be considerate. Avoid wastage of electricity and water. Switch off lights when not necessary. Don’t leave mobile phones connected to power sockets even after they are fully charged. If not necessary, try to make up with one bath a day. Every little thing you do in conserving power and water goes a long way in helping other guests enjoy the experience of Honey Valley just like you wish to. Moreover, it prevents over-taxing the natural reserves that sustain and support the natural wildlife in the region. Do coöperate with us in maintaining the delicate balance between use and abuse of nature’s reserves.

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Honey Valley – A Photographer’s Delight


Right from Coorg Roses, Coorg Lilacs, to over 50 different types of birds, over a dozen varieties of butterflies, monkeys, foxes, wild boars, elephants, to picturesque valleys and towering mountains, Honey Valley is every photographer's delightful dream. Bring your camera along!

Right from flowers such as Coorg Roses, Coorg Lilacs, to over 50 different types of birds, over a dozen varieties of butterflies, monkeys, foxes, wild boars, elephants, to a sedate coffee estate, picturesque valleys and towering mountains, Honey Valley is every photographer’s delightful dream. Bring your camera along!

Sustaining the Honey Valley Ecosystem


Honey Valley is an ecosystem in itself that is home to wild boars, elephants, foxes, wild hare, monkeys, the South-Indian honey-loving martens, flying squirrels and dozens of different species of plants, insects, and birds. We are committed to protecting and maintaining the fragile balance between man and nature here in the very best way possible. All our guests are requested to cooperate with us.

Honey Valley is an ecosystem in itself that is home to wild boars, elephants, foxes, wild rabbits, monkeys, the South-Indian honey-loving martens, flying squirrels and dozens of different species of plants, insects, and birds. We are committed to protecting and maintaining the fragile balance between man and nature here in the very best way possible. All our guests are requested to coöperate with us.

Honey Valley, apart from being home to the our family, is also home to many varied and wonderful species of wild life, both big and small. Wild boars, foxes, wild hares, monkeys, ant-eaters, to varieties of snails, frogs, squirrels, butterflies and birds live here. Over Fifty different types of birds have been, as yet, spotted in and around Honey Valley. As a guest, your thoughtfulness can make sure their continued existence in the valley. Below are a few guidelines:

(A). Avoid high decibel noises such as loud music, boisterous revelry, and parties either in the day or night. While they disturb other guests greatly, they practically scare the life out of most birds and animals around forcing them to abandon their homes – the Valley. Be considerate. Do not disrupt the gentle and precarious ecosystem that is Honey Valley.

(B) When hiking, avoid leaving behind trash such as plastic bottles, biscuit wrappers, and disposable plates. Most water-bodies you see in the jungle are a source of sustenance for both Man and Animal. Over 70 families in a village downhill depend on drinking water from these streams and waterfalls. Animals are known to die due to ingestion of plastic waste, especially plastic bags, over a period of time. Respect their need for clean water. Respect their lives.

(c) Thousands of nature-loving people like you visit Honey Valley every year. This gives birth to, among other many many wonderful things, an unavoidable but ugly end result – garbage. Tonnes and tonnes of garbage a year. In a delicate ecosystem that is Honey Valley, waste management requires greater thought, care and effort. And your coöperation as our guest is essential if we are to continue keeping the Valley uncontaminated, undisturbed for not just us but also the abundant wildlife, and the rich flora and fauna.

All you have to do is avoid littering or throwing cigarette butts on the ground. Always use the garbage cans and ash trays provided in your room, and in all common areas in the property. This ensures that no trash is unaccounted for, and what needs be burned will be burned, what can go as compost will go as compost, what can be recycled will be recycled. Be kind to the Valley. Help us keep it pristine and clean. Help her stay alive.

It is the coöperation, support and affection from well-wishing guests like you that allows Honey Valley continue providing a novel holiday experience to nature lovers world over. We appreciate your goodwill, and your presence in our home. Enjoy your stay. Enjoy the food. Enjoy the Valley.

 

Mt.Tadianadamol Trek


Mt.Tadianadamol Trek

A 24 km round-trip trek from Honey Valley that is physically exhausting, emotionally draining, and spiritually uplifting. The King of all treks in the region.

Mt. Tadiandamol is the reason backpackers, birdwatchers, hikers and nature lovers realised that there is more to Coorg than Madikeri. He has a pride of place in Coorg history. For centuries he has stood as a lone sentinel, towering over lesser peaks and serving as a landmark to seafarers. Over time, he has seen spices from Coorg being exchanged for salt in Kerala. He has observed also the later exchange of culture. How the open shrines of Coorg acquired the typical Kerala roof. And he watched the rain god Igguthappa, along with his brothers and sister, migrate from Kerala to Kodagu. Soon after, the sky darkened. Igguthappa had smiled. Along with him, he had brought rain. A Malabar whistling thrush, his blue-black coat ruffled, is caught unawares by the fat drops of rain and his melodious off-key whistle trapped inside his throat. And as you stand at the peak, Tadianadamol will cover himself in a giant white cloak and disappear from view… Now it is just you, the amplified sounds of a rainforests and a faint mountain trail, with no end in sight.

There is something awe-inspiring about the name itself. Derived from Malayalam to loosely mean ‘I’m the Tallest’ (Tadi means broad, yenda is mine and mol is top), Tadianadamol, at 5,730 ft, is the highest peak in Coorg and the second highest in Karnataka after Mullaiyanagiri in the Baba Budan Range. Tadianadamol lures trekkers with the promise of a glimpse of the coastline on a clear day. For the most part, the trek is gentle, but the last quarter is a steep climb. The trail from Honey Valley takes 3 hours 30 mins one way and passes through thick rainforest and scenic terrain. If you plan to attempt the trek, an early start is recommended.

If you require a lunch pack and/or a guide, please do inform us a day in advance.

Coorg Wildlife Society


Coorg Wildlife SocietyCoorg Wildlife Society is a community initiative to promote wildlife and environmental conservation in the region. Its efforts are primarily aimed at increasing awareness about the catchment area on the Cauvery River. The society organizes treks ( at a cost) to Pushpagiri, Brahmagiri Sanctuary and many other areas of Coorg. It also provides licences for angling in the Cauvery for a nominal cost. Though you must return your catch to the river, there is nothing as thrilling as catching a 30 – 40 kg mahseer if you are into fishing.